Which body part catches fire the easiest?

your hair.Hair is keratin which is composed of approximately 51% carbon, 21% oxygen, 17% nitrogen, 6% hydrogen, and 5% sulfur.When some heat is applied then the chemical bonds which hold those elements in their place in complex molecules, start to break down,

For someone completely new to chemistry, where is the best place to start learning?

Chemistry is a vast subject and It has many branches to it. The best way to learn chemistry to take an exam based approach which is to learn chemistry targeting a particular exam or course.If you are completely new to chemistry you must start from

Is maths compulsory for biochemistry?

No not much maths is required. If you are in India, you need to know (at the most) maths upto HSC leve (Std. XII) level.

How long can one survive without any proteins?

You would die very, very quickly, if not instantly. Without proteins, these would be some of the immediate effects:Proteins make up ~50% of the dry mass of a cell, so you'd lose a great deal of your body mass in an instant.Without actin, myosin and tubulin, each of your cells would

Is maths compulsory for biochemistry?

No not much maths is required. If you are in India, you need to know (at the most) maths upto HSC leve (Std. XII) level.

What are the tips for reading Life Sciences journal articles for beginners?

I too began recently. And I was fortunate to have a few experts in life sciences mentor me. Begin with reading summaries of papers published. There are many sites that write summaries depending on the type of readers. So it's presented in

What are the best books for physiology, anatomy and biochemistry?

For a quality college-level anatomy and physiology text, I will always recommend Saladin. The textbook boasts some of the most engaging writing you can find in non-fiction texts, and beautifully detailed art and photographs.

How much Mg is more powerful in medicines?

Mg denotes milli grams The amount of efficacy (powerful  in your terms) varies with different drugs certain drugs eg cyanide is required in small amount to be fatal Certain drugs eg benzodiazepines need high doses comparatively

As the unit of energy is joules, why is the human body's energy called ATP?

Joule is not THE unit of energy, but A unit of energy.There also calories, electron-volts, etc.ATP (adenosine triphosphate) is a molecule that is responsible for most of the energy that is used in biological processes, It does by splitting off

Can drinking chloroform cause death?

Some do not die while drinking chloroform. It's still not certain at which amount you can die from. Some die while drinking 100 ml or 10 ml. It most likely depends on the person who is drinking it and the amount that can interact with their body. Chloroform is a possible carcinogen and

What are the different types of carbohydrates?

This classification is inspired by the excellent work of Jason and Mira Calton authors of the book Rich Food, Poor Food, and many others.I have separated carbohydrates into three categories that are based on nutrient density plus avoiding possible toxins or antinutrients.However, please remember to LISTEN TO YOUR BODY and see how you feel after eating these

Why can't we live without proteins?

Your question is akin to asking, "Why can't cars move without wheels?". Proteins are the workhorses of life, the cogs which turn to the cadence of the genome. They are foundational to life as we understand it today (see below).Rather than looking for specific examples, it would be

What kinds of sauces might have trans fat?

What kinds of sauces might have trans fat?This might not seem responsive, but my answer is, "sauces where the cook decided to go with trans fat options."I believe that rather than get a list of sauces, you'd be better served (no pun intended, but since I saw

Is there a scientific reason that soups and sauces taste better the next day?

Is there a scientific reason that soups and sauces taste better the next day?Not sure if it is scientific, but the reason they taste better is because the ingredients have had time to macerate/meld.An easy example would be strawberries and sugar. You slice up the

How many glucose transpoters are present in our body?

The human genome encodes 14 similar transporters that deliver glucose and other sugar into different type of cells are called Glucose Transporters aka GLUT. The GLUT family is large group of transporters, collectively termed the major Facilitator Superfamily.The GLUT family

What is the most common glucose type found in human body; alpha or beta?

There is a critical distinction that is important to make in your question - Are you referring to glucose alone, or glucose monomers that are part of longer polysaccharides?If you want to know about glucose monomers in polysaccharides, they are mostly found in the alpha conformation. Animals don't have enzymes that can

Why does a reduction of L-gulose with NaBH4 lead to the same alditol (D-glucitol) that a reduction of D-glucose have?

Reduction of D-glucose gives D-glucitol, L-glucose gives L-glucitol, D-gulose gives D-gulitol and L-gulose gives L-gulitol. However the ends of the molecules are now identical so that if you rotate the Fischer Projection diagrams by 180 degrees in the plane of the paper, which is permitted and does not alter the sense of the diagram, you will see

How many glucose transpoters are present in our body?

The human genome encodes 14 similar transporters that deliver glucose and other sugar into different type of cells are called Glucose Transporters aka GLUT. The GLUT family is large group of transporters, collectively termed the major Facilitator Superfamily.The GLUT family

What is the most common glucose type found in human body; alpha or beta?

There is a critical distinction that is important to make in your question - Are you referring to glucose alone, or glucose monomers that are part of longer polysaccharides?If you want to know about glucose monomers in polysaccharides, they are mostly found in the alpha conformation. Animals don't have enzymes that can

Why does a reduction of L-gulose with NaBH4 lead to the same alditol (D-glucitol) that a reduction of D-glucose have?

Reduction of D-glucose gives D-glucitol, L-glucose gives L-glucitol, D-gulose gives D-gulitol and L-gulose gives L-gulitol. However the ends of the molecules are now identical so that if you rotate the Fischer Projection diagrams by 180 degrees in the plane of the paper, which is permitted and does not alter the sense of the diagram, you will see

What protein is found in animals but not in plants?

Okay, I can't answer the question without doing some research and the topic doesn't interest me enough to trigger that course of action, but I can give you a few tips as to which direction to take if you want to find an answer yourself. Look for animal-specific enzymes...

What are some common acids? Where are they found?

What are some common acids? Where are they found?In biology?DNA is an acid ... it is a nucleic acid. In eukaryotic cells, DNA is found in the nucleus and in mitochondria ... and in plants, also in chloroplasts. In prokaryotes, DNA is found in the nucleoid.RNA is also an acid ... it